Learning Is Our Second Chance

My Quote 2

It’s been a while since I’ve composed a post about an inspirational quote, and it’s been even longer since that quote has been one of my own. I’m rectifying that today:

“Learning, in its truest form, is the realization of our second chance fantasies.”

-TheHaysWay

How often do you get the question, “If you could go back in time and change one thing that’s happened in your life, what would it be?” Sometimes, others ask us this question. Many times, we ask ourselves that question. It is humanity’s way of checking our regrets. We regret those moments that we felt did not go the way we wanted them to because we chose poorly. Maybe ill-conceived words decimated a relationship, be it with an acquaintance, a friend, a family member, or a lover. Maybe a catastrophic decision closed the door on an opportunity, like a career.

No matter what others tell you or what you tell yourself, we ALL experience regret at some point in life. Yet, there are some people that have no regrets. When you hear someone say that they have no regrets, they often don’t include the fact that they used to have regrets. How did they eliminate them?

When one experiences a moment one regrets, one tends to replay that moment in their head with all of the different possible outcomes that would have been preferable to the real outcome. Those different outcomes are our second chance fantasies; When we are asked about what we would go back and change about our life, they are usually the clarification we tack on the end of our response. “If time travel was possible…”

It’s not.

A day may come when time travel becomes a reality, but it is not this day. The good news is that time travel is not necessary to realize our second chance fantasies. The key to freeing oneself of regret is learning from those second chance fantasies. If you decimate a friendship by telling your friend to go to hell, you say kinder and more reasonable things in your other friendships. If you close the door on your dream job by missing a crucial interview because you needed an extra hour of sleep, you start setting your alarms earlier for future interviews.

Everybody makes mistakes and the truth is, not a soul among us can take back mistakes we’ve made. But, every single one of us has the capacity to learn from our mistakes, ensuring that we do not repeat them in the future. We learn from our second chance fantasies by taking what we should have done in a moment we regret, and turning that into what we actually do in a similar moment in the future.

Learn from your mistakes.

Advertisements

2018 Fantasy Football Weekly: May 24

Image result for football field
Football Field|by danxoneil Football Field|by danxoneil; Photo From Flickr

You probably remember my Way Too Early Fantasy Rankings from a couple of weeks ago. Well, I’ve changed my mind on what I said in that post; My 2018 fantasy football analysis is no longer going in alphabetical order–it’s all over the place. It’s in complete chaos. The good news is that NFL.com has opened their mock drafts, so I have a more updated list of players to work with, including the rookies. That also means I can base my rankings more on where players should be drafted, rather than how many points they will score this season (ex: QBs will score the most points, but the gap between the best and the worst QBs is significantly less than the gap between the best and the worst RBs and WRs). Anyway, I’m trying to get my poop in a group (s*** together, if you prefer). Here is my first official Top 25 2018 Fantasy Fooball Ranking, in the order in which you should draft them:

 

  1. Le’Veon Bell, RB, Pittsburgh Steelers (NFL.com ranking: 1)
  2. Ezekiel Elliott, RB, Dallas Cowboys (3)
  3. Todd Gurley, RB, Los Angeles Rams (2)
  4. David Johnson, RB, Arizona Cardinals (4)
  5. Alvin Kamara, RB, New Orleans Saints (6)
  6. DeAndre Hopkins, WR, Houston Texans (10)
  7. Julio Jones, WR, Atlanta Falcons (12) 

    Image result for julio jones
    Julio Jones catching a pass; Photo from Wikimedia Commons
  8. Leonard Fournette, RB, Jacksonville Jaguars (9)
  9. Antonio Brown, WR, Pittsburgh Steelers (5)
  10. Kareem Hunt, RB, Kansas City Chiefs (8)
  11. Devonta Freeman, RB, Atlanta Falcons (18)
  12. Odell Beckham Jr, WR, New York Giants (11)
  13. Saquon Barkley, RB, New York Giants (7)
  14. Melvin Gordon, RB, Los Angeles Chargers (13)
  15. Michael Thomas, WR, New Orleans Saints (15)
  16. LeSean McCoy, RB, Buffalo Bills (17)
  17. Mike Evans, WR, Tampa Bay Buccaneers (20)
  18. Keenan Allen, WR, Los Angeles Chargers (14)
  19. Christian McCaffrey, RB, Carolina Panthers (19)
  20. Dalvin Cook, RB, Minnesota Vikings (16)
  21. Davante Adams, WR, Green Bay Packers (22)
  22. AJ Green, WR, Cincinnati Bengals (21)
  23. Adam Thielen, WR, Minnesota Vikings (24)
  24. Rob Gronkowski, TE, New England Patriots (23)
  25. TY Hilton, WR, Indianapolis Colts (29)

Music Spotlight: The Score

Image result for the score
The Score-Unstoppable (hour version); Photo from YouTube

A band I’ve been hearing a lot of lately is The Score. This, in part, is due to the fact that I have 16 of their songs in my Spotify playlists. But, they’ve also been getting more recognition on a larger scale; I’ve started hearing a couple of their songs in commercials (for example, this Battlefield 1 official trailer from last year). Their latest album (which is also their debut album), Atlas, was released last October and is absolutely fantastic. I definitely recommend checking them out, especially if you like pop rock. If you’re short on time (or patience:) and you don’t want to listen through the whole album, my favorite song on the album is “Revolution,” unless you’re listening to the Deluxe version, in which case my favorite song is “Money Run Low.”

Fixing the NBA’s Imbalance of Power

Image result for nba
2009 NBA Playoffs|by RMTip21; Photo from Flickr

It’s no secret that the NBA has become EXTREMELY top-heavy. That’s why the difference between the 2017 and 2018 NBA Playoffs is 4 teams (that’s right, the playoff field was only 25% different). That’s why the 2018 NBA Playoffs are on the brink of bringing us a Cleveland Cavaliers versus Golden State Warriors NBA Finals matchup for the FORUTH YEAR IN A ROW, with the Cavs having just evened their series against the Boston Celtics at 2-2, and the Warriors having a 2-1 lead in their series against the Houston Rockets including a win in Houston already. It’s like the NBA decided that instead of just a seven game series each year, they should play seven, seven game series over seven years to decide an NBA Championship.

 

Image result for nba eastern conference
LeBron James (right) posts up Klay Thompson (left) at the 2016 NBA Finals; Photo from Wikipedia

Are there people in this world–not including Cavs and Warriors fans–who still enjoy watching the Cavs and Warriors meet in the Finals?

I don’t, and it’s not just because I want my Portland Trail Blazers to make it (though, that would obviously be awesome). Take this season for example: I’m so sick of the Warriors winning that I actually screamed in excitement when the New Orleans Pelicans won a single game against them in their playoff series, despite the fact that in the Pelicans’ previous playoff series, they swept my Blazers in completely dominating fashion.

We know there is a problem in the NBA’s balance of power: How can it be fixed? Here are a few ideas:

Image result for money
Money Cash; Photo from Wikimedia Commons
  • Change the heck out of the salary cap policies. The NBA has ridiculous salary cap policies, most notably the presence of a “soft” salary cap in addition to the “hard” salary cap. The soft salary cap gives NBA teams MANY exceptions which allow them to go over the soft cap to sign players. I may go into those in more detail in another post, but for the sake of preventing this post from getting too long, I’ll just leave you with this: According to spotrac.com, the 5 NBA teams that are furthest over the cap are all 2018 playoff teams and the top 2 of those are the Cavaliers and the Warriors. I’m guessing the billionaire owners don’t mind spending so much money considering they are competing for a championship every season (which also usually means greater fan attendance and higher ticket prices to make up for the extra money spent).
Image result for nba tv
NBA TV; Photo from Wikimedia Commons
  • Change the playoff format from seven game playoff series to single game matchups. Everybody loves March Madness in College Basketball because nobody knows what will happen–case-in-point: UMBC. That’s because if a team wants to win it all, they have to play their best in EVERY GAME. If the favorites take a game off, the underdogs will rise. The seven game playoff series pretty much guarantees that the better team will advance to the next round, which is occasionally a lower seeded team. But that playoff format is boring. Want proof? Viewership numbers from Showbuzz Daily and TV By the Numbers on Wikipedia indicate that the clinching game is consistently, BY FAR the most viewed game in the NBA Finals, most notably in 2016 and 2014:
    • 2016- 10.32 million more viewers of final game than second-most watched game. Gap between second-most viewed and least-viewed: 4.23 million viewers.
    • 2014- 2.46 million more viewers of final game than second-most watched game. Gap between second-most viewed and least-viewed: 0.76 million viewers.
  • Conference Realignment. This solution is the easiest, yet least practical. It’s simple: If the Warriors and Cavs play in the same conference, they can’t play against each other in the NBA Finals. It’s complicated: This would involve more traveling for teams, which would wear out the players more and cost the teams more.
Image result for nba finals
2012 NBA Finals-Heat vs Thunder|by RMTip21; Photo from Flickr

College football has been trying to stop Nick Saban, so why isn’t the NBA trying to stop the Warriors and Cavs? Maybe there is a better idea out there to level the competition in the NBA (if you have an idea, let me know in the comments), but certainly we are at the point where something needs to be done.

Movie Talk- Avengers: Infinity War IS The Matrix

SPOILER ALERT: Most of the movies I’m going to be discussing have been out for several years (some for multiple decades) but the most recent movie I will be including is Avengers: Infinity War, so if you still have not seen that movie, you may not want to continue.

Image result for avengers infinity war
Avengers Infinity War; Photo from Wikipedia

I was re-watching the original The Matrix this weekend because the trilogy is streaming on Hulu right now (the second and third in the trilogy are, largely, crappy. The original one is cinematic gold). In the movie, there is a line where Agent Smith (Hugo Weaving) is discussing humanity with Morpheus (Laurence Fishburne); He compares humanity to a virus because, rather than attempting to live with the natural equilibrium that most species work with, we continue to multiply and deplete natural resources. Let me guess: that line sounds familiar to you, but you haven’t watched The Matrix for a while? That’s probably because Thanos (Josh Brolin) has a very similar line in Avengers: Infinity War. He tells the story of his home planet–Titan–which was destroyed because his species continued to multiply until they depleted their natural resources. In fact, that line is Thanos’ justification for his quest to destroy (or save) half of the beings in the universe. Agent Smith also uses that point to justify to Morpheus why it was right for the machines to plug all of humanity into The Matrix (roll credits).

Takeaway: Thanos is Agent Smith.

Image result for agent smith
Agent Smith Matrix; Photo from Flickr

Maybe that’s a reach, but imagine this: Humanity knows how to travel through space, so logically the AI we create does, too. They do so and establish versions of The Matrix on other planets, including Titan. If the machines can do that, it’s reasonable to assume that they would have some form of interplanetary communication. Therefore, they hear about what happened on Earth respond with two actions:

  1. They modify each planet’s version of Agent Smith.
  2. They send more machines back to Earth to reclaim it and reestablish The Matrix there.
Thanos Infinity 4.png
Thanos; Photo from Wikipedia

Now, humanity progresses and makes discoveries over time and likely, aliens do so as well. So, over time the different planets’ Matrices meld together as alien species and humans discover one another. Eventually, humanity’s melded version of The Matrix reaches as far as the Marvel Cinematic Universe does. During all of this, the machines are consistently improving Agent Smith because he needs to be able to deal with many different species now. The problem with the last Agent Smith was that he was designed to deal with humans who questioned the system. So, the new Agent Smith draws attention away from the questioning of the system by trying to destroy the peace within it (for example, attempting to eliminate half of the population of the universe). To do this, he needs more individual power than a human form will afford him. So, he decides to take the massive form of a member of the Titan species, which is Thanos.

To recap:

  • The Matrix has expanded from Earth to become a universal system of domination for the machines.
  • Agent Smith has changed his objective from ‘stop people who question the system’ to ‘prevent people from questioning the system in the first place by threatening to catastrophically alter it’
  • In order to complete his new objective, Agent Smith becomes the massive life form of Thanos (of the Titan species) because it affords him the individual, physical power he needs.

Hence, Thanos is Agent Smith.

Drop the mic.

Image result for the matrix
The Matrix DVD Cover; Photo from Amazon

Unfortunately, there is no evidence to support the jumps I made throughout that tale. That said, there is also no evidence to deny the jumps I made throughout that tale…except one part. While, in our “real world” we progress and make discoveries as a species and a society, that’s not how it works in The Matrix. Recall one of Morpheus’ conversations with Neo (Keanu Reeves), where Morpheus explains that The Matrix has everyone living in the 1990’s, while in their real world, it is more like 2190. Therefore, that suggests the machines do not program The Matrix in a manner that progresses mankind, which, in turn, means that there would not be a logical reason to meld different species’ Matrices together because humanity is unable to make discoveries of that magnitude (aliens) within The Matrix.

That’s all kind of a bummer for my extended Matrix fan-fiction, but think about this for a second: The ONLY part of my tale that The Matrix trilogy can definitively disprove is the progression of societies and the resulting melding of Matrices. There is no evidence in the movies to disprove the notion that the machines could have overrun other species on other planets to plug those species into their own, unique version of The Matrix. If any movie studio out there wants to reboot The Matrix, holla’ at me in the comments section!

Construction In Progress

I haven’t posted in over a week, but rest assured, I’ve been preparing stuff for the upcoming (and yet, still far too distant) NFL season. My last post featured the beginning of my 2018 fantasy football analysis, so I figured it was only fair to show you the beginning of my other bigger project I’ve been working on: my 2018 NFL win projections. Here are my predictions for which teams will win which games in Week 1 of the 2018 NFL season:

Week 1

Atlanta Falcons @ Philadelphia Eagles- (Atlanta Falcons)

Image result for touchdown celebration
Ezekiel Elliott; Photo from Wikipedia

Buffalo Bills @ Baltimore Ravens- (Baltimore Ravens)

Jacksonville Jaguars @ New York Giants- (Jacksonville Jaguars)

Tampa Bay Buccaneers @ New Orleans Saints- (New Orleans Saints)

Houston Texans @ New England Patriots- (New England Patriots)

San Francisco 49ers @ Minnesota Vikings- (Minnesota Vikings)

Tennessee Titans @ Miami Dolphins- (Tennessee Titans)

Cincinnati Bengals @ Indianapolis Colts- (Cincinnati Bengals)

Pittsburgh Steelers @ Cleveland Browns- (Pittsburgh Steelers)

Kansas City Chiefs @ Los Angeles Chargers- (Los Angeles Chargers)

Seattle Seahawks @ Denver Broncos- (Denver Broncos)

Dallas Cowboys @ Carolina Panthers- (Dallas Cowboys)

Washington Redskins @ Arizona Cardinals- (Washington Redskins)

Chicago Bears @ Green Bay Packers- (Green Bay Packers)

New York Jets @ Detroit Lions- (Detroit Lions)

Los Angeles Rams @ Oakland Raiders- (Oakland Raiders)

2018 Way Too Early Fantasy Football Rankings 1.0

Image result for football
Football on a Field; Photo from Flickr

You may have noticed that my Fantasy Football page reappeared a couple of days ago. I’m working on my complete fantasy football analysis over there. I’m working in alphabetical order by last name, so it my take a while. The good news is, fantasy football drafts on nfl.com don’t start for more than a month, by which time you should have sufficient information to crush it in your fantasy football leagues this season. In the meantime, I took the liberty of creating this short Top 25 ranking for the upcoming fantasy football season. Please note: Don’t take these rankings super seriously. I simply took the Top 25 fantasy point scorers from last season and re-ranked them based upon how I think they’ll perform this season. I have yet to do thorough analysis on most of these guys, so these rankings should change a lot over the next month+. Undoubtedly, this season’s actual Top 25 will not contain the exact same 25 players from last year (for example, I would be SHOCKED if Tyrod Taylor ended up in the Top 25 again this season. I would be SHOCKED if he ended up in the Top 25 QBs.); This is just a starting point to give you guys a taste of where I’m going. Here we go…

Image result for carson wentz
Carson Wentz; Photo from Wikipedia
  1. Carson Wentz, QB, Philadelphia Eagles (Last Season: 6)
  2. Todd Gurley, RB, Los Angeles Rams (2)
  3. Dak Prescott, QB, Dallas Cowboys (12)
  4. Tom Brady, QB, New England Patriots (4)
  5. Russell Wilson, QB, Seattle Seahawks (1)
  6. Cam Newton, QB, Carolina Panthers (3)
  7. Jared Goff, QB, Los Angeles Rams (14)
  8. Phillip Rivers, QB, Los Angeles Chargers (9)
  9. Matt Ryan, QB, Atlanta Falcons (20)
  10. Kirk Cousins, QB, Minnesota Vikings (7)
  11. Ben Roethlisberger, QB, Pittsburgh Steelers (11)
  12. Drew Brees, QB, New Orleans Saints (10)
  13. Le’Veon Bell, RB, Pittsburgh Steelers (13)
  14. Blake Bortles, QB, Jacksonville Jaguars (15)
  15. Matthew Stafford, QB, Detroit Lions (8)
  16. DeAndre Hopkins, WR, Houston Texans (23)
  17. Alvin Kamara, RB, New Orleans Saints (18)
  18. Melvin Gordon, RB, Los Angeles Chargers (19)
  19. Alex Smith, QB, Washington Redskins (5)
  20. Kareem Hunt, RB, Kansas City Chiefs (16)
  21. Case Keenum, QB, Denver Broncos (17)
  22. Marcus Mariota, QB, Tennessee Titans (25)
  23. Andy Dalton, QB, Cincinnati Bengals (24)
  24. Mark Ingram, RB, New Orleans Saints (22)
  25. Tyrod Taylor, QB, Cleveland Browns (21)

Happy Star Wars Day 2018!

Image result for star wars
Star Wars; Photo from Wikipedia

Star Wars I Star Wars found Star Wars myself Star Wars thinking Star Wars about Star Wars my Star Wars thoughts Star Wars today Star Wars (as Star Wars I Star Wars often Star Wars do) Star Wars and Star Wars I Star Wars started Star Wars thinking Star Wars about Star Wars my Star Wars thought Star Wars process Star Wars in Star Wars relation Star Wars to Star Wars (this Star Wars is Star Wars actually, Star Wars in Star Wars a Star Wars roundabout Star Wars way, Star Wars thanks Star Wars to Star Wars Psych) Star Wars.

There was a scene from the episode of Psych entitled “Cog Blocked” in which Woody is speaking to Shawn and Gus and states that he “put on [his] forensic pathologist hat and imagined what Dr. Jordan Cavanaugh would do if this were an episode of ‘Crossing Jordan.'” This lead me to think about the decisions I make in relation to Star Wars characters:

  • What would Luke Skywalker do if this were an episode from the Original Trilogy? There’s probably a 50/50 chance of that being a good idea.
  • What would Anakin Skywalker do if this were an episode from the Prequel Trilogy? DON’T DO THAT!
  • What would Rey do if this were an episode from the New Trilogy?…That one didn’t really help me make decisions because the answer is anything and everything. Rey can do anything and everything which is highly unrealistic in any situation I may find myself in.

Image result for luke skywalker blue lightsaber

Essentially, I came to the conclusion that Luke is probably the best bet for ‘protagonist to think like.’ Mostly because he’s the most realistic and relate-able of the three primary protagonists across the three Star Wars trilogies. And therein lies the answer as to why the Original Trilogy is so much better than the other two trilogies. However, I’m staring at the Star Wars: The Force Awakens poster that’s hanging in my room as I write this. So, which character from that episode is the best bet for parallel thinking and application of said thinking to real-life situations? I’ve settled quite nicely on Finn for a few reasons:

  • He starts out (essentially) as a mindless drone who is doing exactly what he has been raised to do without any independent thought. He’s a Stormtrooper. (That’s a summary of just about every Elementary Schooler in the history of the universe.)
  • Then, he suddenly questions everything he’s been taught. In the middle of the raid of the Jakku village, his friend dies, causing him to start looking around at his surroundings–at what he and the other Stormtroopers are doing. (That’s not even sort of close to being in the proximity of a summary of the majority of Middle Schoolers. In fact, that step probably only occurs in about 1% of Middle Schoolers. Maybe that’s a little low, but most Middle Schoolers are still totally obedient soldiers and I confess, I was one.)
  • Next, he decides to turn his back on everything he’s been taught. He helps Poe Dameron escape so that he can escape the First Order. (Again, nowhere in the vicinity of describing the majority of High Schoolers. You likely have a better chance of winning the lottery than you do of finding a High Schooler who does this. And I’m not talking about experimenting with alcohol after years of being taught not to drink in schools (far too many young people do this to rebel, and that is NOT how one should rebel. Don’t be a stupid rebel, there are smart ways to rebel). I’m talking about trying another religion than the one a person grew up with, or listening to a different political party…challenging deep-rooted morals and beliefs. You know, the ones every kid has drilled into them by their schools and parents.)
  • Finally, he enters the stage of being completely confused as he’s trying to figure out his new, unique, individual view on life. He starts out just wanting to get away from the First Order, but eventually completes a full 180 to join the Resistance. (This is the college/adulthood stage.)

Image result for finn star wars

My final takeaway from this was that Finn went from being the close-minded person that most people are raised as, to being the open-minded person that we should all strive to be, in order to find out who he truly is as an individual (which is sort of like self-actualization).

What would Finn do if this was The Force Awakens? There’s a good chance the answer to this question will lead to the answering of other questions.

Happy Star Wars Day from TheHaysWay…

And May the Force (Fourth) be With You!

2018 NFL Draft Class Rankings

I previously promised a more in-depth look at my plus-minus system; Here it is in my ranking of the draft classes from the 2018 NFL Draft. The plus-minus system reflects the overall value of each teams’ collective drafts. The greater the plus is, the greater a value a team got. The minuses are reaches-players who were drafted earlier than they should have been. The the greater a minus is, the more consistently and/or greatly a team reached throughout the draft.

1. Minnesota Vikings: +207

Best Value Pick: Colby Gossett, OG, Appalachian State (+89)

Worst Value Pick: Mike Hughes, CB, UCF (+4)

The Rest:

  • Brian O’Neill, OT, Pittsburgh (+10)
  • Jalyn Holmes, DE, Ohio State (+19)
  • Tyler Conklin, TE, Central Michigan (+15)
  • Daniel Carlson, K, Auburn (+70)
  • Ade Aruna, EDGE, Tulane (N/A)
  • Devante Downs, LB, California (N/A)

2. Dallas Cowboys: +165

Best Value Pick: Bo Scarbrough, RB, Alabama (+90)

Worst Value Pick: Leighton Vander Esch, LB, Boise State (-5)

The Rest:

  • Connor Williams, OT, Texas (+19)
  • Michael Gallup, WR, Colorado State (-3)
  • Dorance Armstrong, EDGE, Kansas (+28)
  • Dalton Schultz, TE, Stanford (+27)
  • Mike White, QB, Western Kentucky (+9)
  • Chris Covington, OLB, Indiana (N/A)
  • Cedrick Wilson, WR, Boise State (N/A)

3. Green Bay Packers: +126

Related image
Equanimeous St. Brown (Notre Dame WR) vs Nevada; Photo from Youtube

 

 

Best Value Pick: Equanimeous St Brown, WR, Notre Dame (+128)

Worst Value Pick: Cole Madison, OG, Washington State (-35)

The Rest:

  • Jaire Alexander, CB, Louisville (-20)
  • Josh Jackson, CB, Iowa (+26)
  • Oren Burks, LB, Vanderbilt (-23)
  • J’Mon Moore, WR, Missouri (+51)
  • JK Scott, P, Alabama (-1)
  • Marquez Valdes-Scantling, WR, USF (N/A)
  • James Looney, DE, California (N/A)
  • Hunter Bradley, LS, Mississippi State (N/A)
  • Kendall Donnerson, EDGE, Southeast Missouri (N/A)

4. Jacksonville Jaguars: +100

 

 

Best Value Pick: Ronnie Harrison, S, Alabama (+49)

Worst Value Pick: DJ Chark, WR, LSU (+10)

The Rest:

  • Taven Bryan, DT, Florida (+11)
  • Will Richardson, OT, North Carolina State (+30)
  • Tanner Lee, QB, Nebraska (N/A)
  • Leon Jacobs, EDGE, Wisconsin (N/A)
  • Logan Cooke, P, Mississippi State (N/A)

5. Seattle Seahawks: +75

Best Value Pick: Jamarco Jones, OT, Ohio State (+77)

Worst Value Pick: Will Dissly, TE, Washington (-53)

The Rest:

  • Rashaad Penny, RB, San Diego State (-27)
  • Rasheem Greene, DE, USC (+33)
  • Shaquem Griffin, LB, UCF (+37)
  • Tre Flowers, S, Oklahoma State (-27)
  • Michael Dickson, P, Texas (+35)
  • Jake Martin, EDGE, Temple (N/A)
  • Alex Mcgough, QB, Florida International (N/A)

6. New York Jets: +71

Best Value Pick: Parry Nickerson, CB, Tulane (+64)

Worst Value Pick: Chris Herndon, TE, Miami (-60)

The Rest:

  • Sam Darnold, QB, USC (+1)
  • Nathan Shepherd, DT, Fort Hays State (+9)
  • Foley Fatukasi, DT, Connecticut (+57)
  • Trenton Cannon, RB, Virginia State (N/A)

7. New York Giants: +38

Best Value Pick: RJ McIntosh, DT, Miami (+17)

Worst Value Pick: BJ Hill, DT, North Carolina State (-17)

The Rest:

  • Saquon Barkley, RB, Penn State (+1)
  • Will Hernandez, OG, UTEP (+13)
  • Lorenzo Carter, LB, Georgia (+16)
  • Kyle Lauletta, QB, Richmond (+8)

8. Tennessee Titans: +37

Best Value Pick: Luke Falk, QB, Washington State (+34)

Worst Value Pick: Dane Cruikshank, S, Arizona (-21)

The Rest:

  • Rashaan Evans, LB, Alabama (0)
  • Harold Landry, EDGE, Boston College (+24)

9. Baltimore Ravens: +31

Best Value Pick: Deshon Elliott, S, Texas (+53)

Worst Value Pick: Kenny Young, LB, UCLA (-51)

The Rest:

  • Hayden Hurst, TE, South Carolina (-9)
  • Lamar Jackson, QB, Louisville (+5)
  • Orlando Brown, OT, Oklahoma (+46)
  • Mark Andrews, TE, Oklahoma (+10)
  • Anthony Averett, CB, Alabama (+29)
  • Jaleel Scott, WR, New Mexico State (-41)
  • Jordan Lasley, WR, UCLA (-11)
  • Greg Senat, OT, Wagner (N/A)
  • Bradley Bozeman, C, Alabama (N/A)
  • Zach Sieler, DE, Ferris State (N/A)

10. Philadelphia Eagles: +25

Best Value Pick: Josh Sweat, EDGE, Florida State (+66)

Worst Value Pick: Avonte Maddox, CB, Pittsburgh (-48)

The Rest:

  • Dallas Goedert, TE, South Dakota State (+7)
  • Matt Pryor, OT, TCU (N/A)
  • Jordan Mailata, OT, Australia (N/A)

11. Carolina Panthers: +16

Best Value Pick: Kendrick Norton, DT, Miami (+71)

Worst Value Pick: Rashaan Gaulden, CB, Tennessee (-53)

The Rest:

  • DJ Moore, WR, Maryland (-5)
  • Donte Jackson, CB, LSU (+8)
  • Ian Thomas, TE, Indiana (+30)
  • Marquis Haynes, DE, Ole Miss (-23)
  • Jermaine Carter Jr, LB, Maryland (-12)
  • Andre Smith, ILB, North Carolina (N/A)

12. Buffalo Bills: +1

Best Value Pick: Harrison Phillips, DT, Stanford (+47)

Worst Value Pick: Taron Johnson, CB, Weber State (-52)

The Rest:

  • Josh Allen, QB, Wyoming (-4)
  • Tremaine Edmunds, LB, Virginia Tech (+10)
  • Siran Neal, S, Jacksonville State (-19)
  • Wyatt Teller, OG, Virginia Tech (+19)
  • Ray-Ray McCloud, WR, Clemson (N/A)
  • Austin Proehl, WR, North Carolina (N/A)

13. Indianapolis Colts: -5

Related image
Deon Cain official Clemson Career Highlight; Photo from Youtube

Best Value Pick: Deon Cain, WR, Clemson (+118)

Worst Value Pick: Braden Smith, OG, Auburn (-44)

  • Quenton Nelson, OG, Notre Dame (+2)
  • Darius Leonard, OLB, South Carolina State (-25)
  • Kemoko Turay, EDGE, Rutgers (-42)
  • Tyquan Lewis, DE, Ohio State (-26)
  • Nyheim Hines, RB, North Carolina State (-30)
  • Daurice Fountain, WR, Northern Iowa (+46)
  • Jordan Wilkins, RB, Ole Miss (-4)
  • Matthew Adams, LB, Houston (N/A)
  • Zaire Franklin, LB, Syracuse (N/A)

14. Tampa Bay Buccaneers: -9

Best Value Pick: Jack Cichy, ILB, Wisconsin (+77)

Worst Value Pick: Jordan Whitehead, S, Pittsburgh (-56)

  • Vita Vea, DT, Washington (+2)
  • Ronald Jones II, RB, USC (+6)
  • MJ Stewart, CB, North Carolina (-54)
  • Carlton Davis, CB, Auburn (+22)
  • Alex Cappa, OT, Humboldt State (-15)
  • Justin Watson, WR, Pennsylvania (+9)

15. Cincinnati Bengals: -14

Best Value Pick: Sam Hubbard, DE, Ohio State (+24)

Worst Value Pick: Mark Walton, RB, Miami (-27)

  • Billy Price, C, Ohio State (-15)
  • Jessie Bates III, S Wake Forest (+6)
  • Malik Jefferson, LB, Texas (-9)
  • Davontae Harris, CB, Illinois State (+3)
  • Andrew Brown, DE, Virginia (+7)
  • Darius Phillips, CB, Western Michigan (-3)
  • Logan Woodside, QB, Toledo (N/A)
  • Rod Taylor, OG, Mississippi (N/A)
  • Auden Tate, WR, Florida State (N/A)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16. Houston Texans: -19

Best Value Pick: Justin Reid, S, Stanford (+40)

Worst Value Pick: Keke Coutee, WR, Texas Tech (-57)

The Rest:

  • Martinas Rankin, OT, Mississippi State (+18)
  • Jordan Akins, TE, UCF (-42)
  • Duke Ejiofor, DE, Wake Forest (+22)
  • Jordan Thomas, TE, Mississippi State (N/A)
  • Peter Kalambayi, EDGE, Stanford (N/A)
  • Jermaine Kelly, DB, San Jose State (N/A)

17. Los Angeles Chargers: -23

Best Value Pick: Kyzir White, S, West Virginia (+49)

Worst Value Pick: Uchenna Nwosu, LB, USC (-44)

The Rest:

  • Derwin James, S, Florida State (+9)
  • Justin Jones, DT, North Carolina State (-19)
  • Scott Quessenberry, C, UCLA (-18)
  • Dylan Cantrell, WR, Texas Tech (N/A)
  • Justin Jackson, RB, Northwestern (N/A)

18. Detroit Lions: -25

Best Value Pick: Tyrell Crosby, OT, Oregon (+96)

Worst Value Pick: Tracy Walker, S, Louisiana (-91)

The Rest:

  • Frank Ragnow, C, Arkansas (-45)
  • Kerryon Johnson, RB, Auburn (-25)
  • Da’Shawn Hand, DE, Alabama (+40)
  • Nick Bawden, RB, San Diego State (N/A)

19. Washington Redskins: -32

Best Value Pick: Tim Settle, DT, Virginia Tech (+78)

Worst Value Pick: Geron Christian, OT, Louisville (-87)

The Rest:

  • Da’Ron Payne, DT, Alabama (-2)
  • Derrius Guice, RB, LSU (+43)
  • Troy Apke, S, Penn State (-64)
  • Shaun dion Hamilton, ILB, Alabama (N/A)
  • Greg Stroman, CB, Virginia Tech (N/A)

20. Denver Broncos: -43

Best Value Pick: Troy Fumagalli, TE, Wisconsin (+40)

Worst Value Pick: Royce Freeman, RB, Oregon (-62)

The Rest:

  • Bradley Chubb, DE, North Carolina State (+2)
  • Courtland Sutton, WR, SMU (-3)
  • Isaac Yiadom, CB, Boston College (-53)
  • Josey Jewell, LB, Iowa (-2)
  • DaeSean Hamilton, WR, Penn State (+1)
  • Sam Jones, C, Arizona State (+34)
  • Keishawn Bierria, ILB, Washington (N/A)
  • David Williams, RB, Arkansas (N/A)

21. Los Angeles Rams: -45

Best Value Pick: Ogbonnia Okoronkwo, LB, Oklahoma (+34)

Worst Value Pick: Brian Allen, C, Michigan State (-62)

The Rest:

  • Joseph Noteboom, OT, TCU (+14)
  • John Franklin, DE, Stephen F Austin (-38)
  • Micah Kiser, LB, Virginia (+3)
  • John Kelly, RB, Tennessee (+4)
  • Jamil Demby, OG, Maine (N/A)
  • Sebastian Joseph, DT, Rutgers (N/A)
  • Trevon Young, EDGE, Louisville (N/A)
  • Travin Howard, LB, TCU (N/A)
  • Justin Lawler, DE, SMU (N/A)

22. Oakland Raiders: -49

Related image
Maurice Hurst Jr.; Photo from Wikipedia

Best Value Pick: Maurice Hurst, DT, Michigan (+117)

Worst Value Pick: Brandon Parker, OT, North Carolina A&T (-108)

  • Kolton Miller, OT, UCLA (-25)
  • PJ Hall, DT, Sam Houston State (-44)
  • Arden Key, LB, LSU (+32)
  • Nick Nelson, CB, Wisconsin (-21)
  • Johnny Townsend, P, Florida (N/A)
  • Azeem Victor, LB, Washington (N/A)
  • Marcell Ateman, WR, Oklahoma State (N/A)

23. Miami Dolphins: -54

Best Value Pick: Kalen Ballage, RB, Arizona State (+35)

Worst Value Pick: Durham Smythe, TE, Notre Dame (-40)

The Rest:

  • Minkah Fitzpatrick, DB, Alabama (-1)
  • Mike Gesicki, TE, Penn State (-16)
  • Jerome Baker, LB, Ohio State (-32)
  • Cornell Armstrong, DB, Southern Mississippi (N/A)
  • Quentin Poling, LB, Ohio (N/A)
  • Jason Sanders, K, New Mexico (N/A)

24. Cleveland Browns: -54

Best Value Pick: Antonio Callaway, WR, Florida (+39)

Worst Value Pick: Chad Thomas, DE, Miami (-60)

  • Baker Mayfield, QB, Oklahoma (-12)
  • Denzel Ward, CB, Ohio State (-5)
  • Austin Corbett, OG, Nevada (-23)
  • Nick Chubb, RB, Georgia (-24)
  • Genard Avery, LB, Memphis (+31)
  • Damion Ratley, WR, Texas A&M (N/A)
  • Simeon Thomas, DB, Louisiana-Lafayette (N/A)

25. New England Patriots: -62

Best Value Pick: Sony Michel, RB, Georgia (-4)

Worst Value Pick: Ja’Whaun Bentley, LB, Purdue (-30)

The Rest:

  • Isaiah Wynn, OT, Georgia (-7)
  • Duke Dawson, CB, Florida (-21)
  • Christian Sam, ILB, Arizona State (N/A)
  • Braxton Berrios, WR, Miami (N/A)
  • Danny Etling, QB, LSU (N/A)
  • Keion Crossen, DB, Western Carolina (N/A)
  • Ryan Izzo, TE, Florida State (N/A)

26. Chicago Bears: -62

Best Value Pick: Bilal Nichols, DT, Delaware (+17)

Worst Value Pick: Joel Iyiebuniwe, LB, Western Kentucky (-58)

The Rest:

  • Roquan Smith, LB, Georgia (+1)
  • James Daniels, C, Iowa (0)
  • Anthony Miller, WR, Memphis (-22)
  • Kylie Fitts, EDGE, Utah (N/A)
  • Javon Wims, WR, Georgia (N/A)

27. Pittsburgh Steelers: -71

Best Value Pick: Marcus Allen, S, Penn State (+27)

Worst Value Pick: Terrell Edmunds, S, Virginia Tech (-65)

The Rest:

  • James Washington, WR, Oklahoma State (-9)
  • Mason Rudolph, QB, Oklahoma State (-4)
  • Chukwuma Okorafor, OT, Western Michigan (-44)
  • Jaylen Samuels, RB, North Carolina State (+24)
  • Joshua Frazier, DT, Alabama (N/A)

28. Atlanta Falcons: -77

Best Value Pick: Isaiah Oliver, CB, Colorado (+13)

Worst Value Pick: Deadrin Senat, DT, USF (-55)

The Rest:

  • Calvin Ridley, WR, Alabama (+12)
  • Ito Smith, RB, Southern Mississippi (-47)
  • Russell Gage, WR, LSU (N/A)
  • Foye Oluokun, LB, Yale (N/A)
  • Trey Quinn, WR, SMU

29. Arizona Cardinals: -91

Best Value Pick: Christian Kirk, WR, Texas A&M (+14)

Worst Value Pick: Mason Cole, C, Michigan (-71)

The Rest:

  • Josh Rosen, QB, UCLA (+5)
  • Chase Edmonds, RB, Fordham (-39)
  • Chris Campbell, CB, Penn State (N/A)
  • Korey Cunningham, OT, Cincinnati (N/A)

30. New Orleans Saints: -92

Best Value Pick: Natrell Jamerson, S, Wisconsin (-9)

Worst Value Pick: Rick Leonard, OT, Florida State (-46)

The Rest:

  • Marcus Davenport, DE, UTSA (-11)
  • Tre’Quan Smith, WR, UCF (-26)
  • Kamrin Moore, CB, Boston College (N/A)
  • Boston Scott, RB, Louisiana Tech (N/A)
  • Will Clapp, C, LSU (N/A)

31. Kansas City Chiefs: -137

Image result for breeland speaks
Breeland Speaks; Photo from Twitter

Best Value Pick: Armani Watts, S, Texas A&M (+26)

Worst Value Pick: Breeland Speaks, DE, Ole Miss (-123)

The Rest:

  • Derrick Nnadi, DT, Florida State (+3)
  • Dorian O’Daniel, LB, Clemson (-43)
  • Tremon Smith, CB, Central Arkansas (N/A)
  • Reginald McKenzie, OG, Tennessee (N/A)

32. San Francisco 49ers: -261

Best Value Pick: Mike McGlinchey, OT, Notre Dame (-11)

Worst Value Pick: Fred Warner, LB, BYU (-83)

The Rest:

  • Dante Pettis, WR, Washington (-16)
  • Tarvarius Moore, S, Southern Mississippi (-78)
  • Kentavius Street, DE, North Carolina State (-45)
  • DJ Reed, CB, Kansas State (-28)
  • Marcell Harris, S, Florida (N/A)
  • Jullian Taylor, DT, Temple (N/A)
  • Richie James, WR, Middle Tennessee (N/A)

2018 NFL Draft Grades

Last time, I covered the best values in undrafted free agent signings. Today, I will be grading the draft classes from the 2018 NFL Draft. I have used a plus-minus system for each team to determine the overall value of each teams’ collective drafts (you will see this in greater depth in my next post, which should be published in the next day or two). For now, here are my letter grades in alphabetical order by team location:

Image result for arizona cardinals

Arizona Cardinals: C-

  • Day 1: A
  • Day 2: C
  • Day 3: F-

Image result for atlanta falcons

Atlanta Falcons: C-

  • Day 1: A+
  • Day 2: C+
  • Day 3: F-

Image result for baltimore ravens

Baltimore Ravens: B-

  • Day 1: B+
  • Day 2: A+
  • Day 3: F

Image result for buffalo bills

Buffalo Bills: B-

  • Day 1: A
  • Day 2: A+
  • Day 3: F-

Image result for carolina panthers

Carolina Panthers: B-

  • Day 1: B+
  • Day 2: C+
  • Day 3: C

Image result for chicago bears

Chicago Bears: C

  • Day 1: A-
  • Day 2: B-
  • Day 3: F-

Image result for cincinnati bengals

Cincinnati Bengals: C+

  • Day 1: B-
  • Day 2: A-
  • Day 3: F+

Image result for cleveland browns

Cleveland Browns: C

  • Day 1: B-
  • Day 2: D-
  • Day 3: C+

Image result for dallas cowboys

Dallas Cowboys: A

  • Day 1: B+
  • Day 2: A-
  • Day 3: A-

Image result for denver broncos

Denver Broncos: C

  • Day 1: A
  • Day 2: F+
  • Day 3: C+

Image result for detroit lions

Detroit Lions: C-

  • Day 1: F+
  • Day 2: F+
  • Day 3: B+

Image result for green bay packers

Green Bay Packers: A-

  • Day 1: B-
  • Day 2: B+
  • Day 3: A-

Image result for houston texans

Houston Texans: C+

  • Day 1: A-
  • Day 2: A-
  • Day 3: F

Image result for indianapolis colts

Indianapolis Colts: C+

  • Day 1: A
  • Day 2: F
  • Day 3: B+

Image result for jacksonville jaguars

Jacksonville Jaguars: B+

  • Day 1: A+
  • Day 2: A+
  • Day 3: D+

Image result for kansas city chiefs

Kansas City Chiefs: D+

  • Day 1: A-
  • Day 2: F-
  • Day 3: D+

Image result for los angeles chargers

Los Angeles Chargers: C+

  • Day 1: A+
  • Day 2: C
  • Day 3: D+

Image result for los angeles rams

Los Angeles Rams: C+

  • Day 1: A-
  • Day 2: A-
  • Day 3: F-

 

 

 

 

 

Image result for miami dolphins

Miami Dolphins: C

  • Day 1: A-
  • Day 2: C+
  • Day 3: F+

Image result for minnesota vikings

Minnesota Vikings: A+

  • Day 1: A
  • Day 2: B+
  • Day 3: A+

Image result for new england patriots

New England Patriots: C

  • Day 1: B
  • Day 2: B-
  • Day 3: F

Image result for new orleans saints

New Orleans Saints: C-

  • Day 1: B
  • Day 2: B-
  • Day 3: F-

Image result for new york giants

New York Giants: B

  • Day 1: A-
  • Day 2: A-
  • Day 3: D+

Image result for new york jets

New York Jets: B

  • Day 1: A-
  • Day 2: B+
  • Day 3: C

Image result for oakland raiders

Oakland Raiders: C-

  • Day 1: C
  • Day 2: F+
  • Day 3: B-

Image result for philadelphia eagles

Philadelphia Eagles: B-

  • Day 1: A-
  • Day 2: B+
  • Day 3: D+

Image result for pittsburgh steelers

Pittsburgh Steelers: C-

  • Day 1: F-
  • Day 2: C
  • Day 3: C

Image result for san francisco 49ers

San Francisco 49ers: F+

  • Day 1: B
  • Day 2: F-
  • Day 3: F-

Image result for seattle seahawks

Seattle Seahawks: B

  • Day 1: C
  • Day 2: A
  • Day 3: C+

Image result for tampa bay buccaneers

Tampa Bay Buccaneers: C+

  • Day 1: A
  • Day 2: B-
  • Day 3: D-

Image result for tennessee titans

Tennessee Titans: B-

  • Day 1: A-
  • Day 2: A-
  • Day 3: D-

Image result for washington redskins

Washington Redskins: C+

  • Day 1: A-
  • Day 2: C+
  • Day 3: D-